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14.12.1 Cross Platform

14.12.1 Cross Platform

architecture( executable=sys.executable, bits='', linkage='')
Queries the given executable (defaults to the Python interpreter binary) for various architecture information.

Returns a tuple (bits, linkage) which contain information about the bit architecture and the linkage format used for the executable. Both values are returned as strings.

Values that cannot be determined are returned as given by the parameter presets. If bits is given as '', the sizeof(pointer) (or sizeof(long) on Python version < 1.5.2) is used as indicator for the supported pointer size.

The function relies on the system's file command to do the actual work. This is available on most if not all Unix platforms and some non-Unix platforms and then only if the executable points to the Python interpreter. Reasonable defaults are used when the above needs are not met.

machine( )
Returns the machine type, e.g. 'i386'. An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined.

node( )
Returns the computer's network name (may not be fully qualified!). An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined.

platform( aliased=0, terse=0)
Returns a single string identifying the underlying platform with as much useful information as possible.

The output is intended to be human readable rather than machine parseable. It may look different on different platforms and this is intended.

If aliased is true, the function will use aliases for various platforms that report system names which differ from their common names, for example SunOS will be reported as Solaris. The system_alias() function is used to implement this.

Setting terse to true causes the function to return only the absolute minimum information needed to identify the platform.

processor( )
Returns the (real) processor name, e.g. 'amdk6'.

An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined. Note that many platforms do not provide this information or simply return the same value as for machine(). NetBSD does this.

python_build( )
Returns a tuple (buildno, builddate) stating the Python build number and date as strings.

python_compiler( )
Returns a string identifying the compiler used for compiling Python.

python_version( )
Returns the Python version as string 'major.minor.patchlevel'

Note that unlike the Python sys.version, the returned value will always include the patchlevel (it defaults to 0).

python_version_tuple( )
Returns the Python version as tuple (major, minor, patchlevel) of strings.

Note that unlike the Python sys.version, the returned value will always include the patchlevel (it defaults to '0').

release( )
Returns the system's release, e.g. '2.2.0' or 'NT' An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined.

system( )
Returns the system/OS name, e.g. 'Linux', 'Windows', or 'Java'. An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined.

system_alias( system, release, version)
Returns (system, release, version) aliased to common marketing names used for some systems. It also does some reordering of the information in some cases where it would otherwise cause confusion.

version( )
Returns the system's release version, e.g. '#3 on degas'. An empty string is returned if the value cannot be determined.

uname( )
Fairly portable uname interface. Returns a tuple of strings (system, node, release, version, machine, processor) identifying the underlying platform.

Note that unlike the os.uname() function this also returns possible processor information as additional tuple entry.

Entries which cannot be determined are set to ''.

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